We’re looking for a few good neighbors

Become a local fire or emergency medical service volunteer and join our extraordinary community of heroes.

Frequently Asked Questions

A. It varies from week to week, but on average you'll put in seven or eight hours. Many volunteers enjoy putting in more.
A. It will cost you nothing. Professional training from experienced personnel will be made available to you.
A. Immediately. And your responsibilities will increase as you gain experience and training.
A. No. Your uniform, equipment – even your annual physical – will be provided for free.
A. You must volunteer for the department or unit that serves the community in which you live. Not sure which one that is? Don’t worry. When you complete our online application we will automatically route it to the appropriate service, based on the home address you provide.
A. The only general limitation for participating in any form of service is age. You must be at least 18 years old to volunteer as an adult. Otherwise, anyone who can meet the physical and mental demands of training and achieve certification may serve as a firefighter or emergency medical specialist. Note that additional, specific considerations, such as area of residence, will also apply. To learn more about volunteering, click on Requirements or Helpful Links in the navigation bar.
A. Yes, indeed. Over the years many women have served within the County’s volunteer fire departments. They have a lot of company, too; it’s estimated that there are between 35,000 and 40,000 female volunteer firefighters in departments across the United States. All firefighting jobs can be performed by a properly trained woman.
A. Click here to fill out the volunteer profile form, and we’ll help put you in touch with your local fire or EMS Agency. Because Districts often overlap town lines, don’t assume that the nearest station is necessarily your local agency – check with us.
A. Your decision to become a fire or emergency medical volunteer is something of which your family can be proud. It is more than just a personal commitment, however. The time involved for both training and service will certainly affect the other members of your family. Emergencies seldom occur at convenient times, so your family will need to understand and accept that plans may need to change at a moment’s notice. In truth, no one can expect to be a successful volunteer without the full support of those whom they care for, and who care for them.

Yes, depending on your family situation, you should definitely include your spouse, children, siblings, and even parents in your considerations, and make sure that they understand the ways in which your decision is likely to affect your family life. To help you, the National Volunteer Fire Council (NVFC) has produced a booklet: What to Expect: A Guide for Family Members of Volunteer Firefighters.
A. Please visit our Helpful Links page where we have compiled a list of organizations that may be of interest to you.
A. While a definite and continuing need for volunteer firefighters and EMS responders exists throughout Suffolk County, we understand that these two opportunities may not be right for everyone. Should this be true in your case, consider contributing to your community’s safety through one of the following Suffolk County programs: the Community Emergency Response Team, the Medical Reserve Corps, or the Auxiliary Police Department. You can learn more about all three here.